Kale again

For the first few years of our CSA, we didn’t know what to do with all the kale we were getting.  We cooked first with the vegetables that we liked more, and knew what to do with.  Kale would often get pushed to the back of our refrigerator and stay there until it was clearly past usable, and then out it would go. Some kale recipes seemed worth trying, but none were worth repeating.  But we kept getting kale so I kept trying, at least occasionally.  The first way I liked kale was in a lentil stew flavored with lemon juice and garam masala.  Once we got used to the taste of kale, we learned to like it a lot, cooked in a lot of different ways, in place of other milder greens.  I was on to something with the lemon, though.  Most of the ways we cook kale have that in common:  lemon or some other acidic flavoring, like red wine vinegar.  

Now we like kale enough that we choose to buy it in the seasons that our CSA doesn’t dictate our vegetables.  It grows reasonably well in winter (presumably in hoop houses) here in Massachusetts, so it’s available at our winter indoor farmers’ market. 

Tonight’s dinner challenge was this:  use up kale (from the farmers’ market) along with leftover rice, tzatziki, and pita bread.  We successfully devised this recipe:

Greek-Inspired Kale

Ingredients: 

  • 1 bunch kale, finely chopped
  • 1 can garbanzos, drained
  • olive oil
  • lemon juice
  • garlic, diced or pressed (onion would work well here, too)
  • dried mint, oregano, basil, and black pepper

In a large skilled, heat the garlic in a generous amount of olive oil. 

Add the garbanzos and kale, and stir them around to mix in the oil and garlic. 

Then add lots of mint, a little oregano and basil, and a few grinds of pepper. 

Cook, stirring as needed, until the kale wilts.  (Avoid over-cooking the kale, even though most recipes instruct you to do just that.) 

Add a very generous splash of lemon juice, stir, and remove from heat.

Enjoy as an entree over rice, with pita triangles and tzatziki on the side.

 

Advertisements

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: